My name is...André Rodriguez

Former Westminster High teacher loves arts

Posted 8/28/17

About me

I am a proud Colorado native.

As an avid fly-fisherman, one of the things I enjoy most about Colorado is that we are just minutes away from excellent fishing opportunities - I enjoy the mountains and being in nature. I also appreciate …

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My name is...André Rodriguez

Former Westminster High teacher loves arts

Posted

About me

I am a proud Colorado native.

As an avid fly-fisherman, one of the things I enjoy most about Colorado is that we are just minutes away from excellent fishing opportunities - I enjoy the mountains and being in nature. I also appreciate how the metro area has incredible appreciation for the arts, great restaurants and a vibrant night life.

But, perhaps the best part about the area is how inclusive we are toward people from all walks of life. We are so fortunate have some of the best people in the entire nation.

Inspiring youth


Recently, I became a member of the education team at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts as a Teaching Artist and Shakespeare Programming Coordinator. The Denver Center for the Performing Arts serves over 105,000 students annually through on-site and in-school programs. Our programs use theatre to inspire youth and adults to become well-rounded, articulate and empathic individuals.

The most rewarding aspect of being an educator is the moment when you know you made a positive impact on a student. Through my work at Westminster High School, we were able to leverage the power of theatre education to raise money for students to receive Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status through the Federal government. When we produced the show Just Like Us, our generous patrons raised enough funds to provide college scholarships to minority students to continue their education and pursue their career dreams.

Good examples lead to good things


When I was in high school I was fortunate enough to have several, very gifted educators. I always had an idea that I would go into teaching, but it was really through my participation in the performing arts programs (choir, band, and theatre) at Pomona High School where I honed my passion for the performing arts. From there, my most influential mentor, Mr. Gavin Mayer—Theatre Teacher, took me under his wing and encouraged me to become an educator.

Debbie Miller (Choir Director) and WL Whaley (Band Director) also had a significant impact on shaping me into the educator I am today. I owe a great deal of gratitude for giving me so many incredible opportunities.

When I am not teaching, I spend a lot of time with my family. My wife and I (we met in the high school marching band—romantic, I know) have two high energy boys that keep us busy. We enjoy gardening and spending time in the outdoors. Fly fishing and fly tying are my favorite past times.

I play soccer every Tuesday night on a Men’s league with my dad. It’s been fun playing with him and schooling some of the old timers.

Padding helps!

One summer I participated in the Cystic Fibrosis, Ride for 65 Roses. As someone that is relatively fit, I was a little over confident in my ability to cycle 70 miles on a mountain pass with little to no training. Until then, I could never figure out why cyclists wear skin tight shorts.

So, in my gym shorts and tennis shoes, I set out amongst all the other riders early one August morning. It wasn’t until mile 10, when I realized that those skin-tight shorts had padding on the back side—oh, was I sorry. Nonetheless, I pushed through and finished in last place out of about 200 riders.

At the end of the day, the group raised a lot of money for research and I learned what it is like for members in the Cystic Fibrosis community to live with such a challenging disease.

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