Secret to log rolling: Fast-moving feet

Posted 6/10/15

To master the art of log rolling, you need balance, control and willpower.

And lots of practice.

A group of determined people—some as young as 7 or 8, others in their 50s—took a shot at the newly popular activity during a free log rolling …

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Secret to log rolling: Fast-moving feet

Posted

To master the art of log rolling, you need balance, control and willpower.

And lots of practice.

A group of determined people—some as young as 7 or 8, others in their 50s—took a shot at the newly popular activity during a free log rolling demo at City Park Recreation Center in Westminster.

Log rolling is becoming a staple in pools and lakes across the country. This summer, Westminster offers intro to log rolling classes and a log rolling series that gives participants the opportunity to perfect their skills.

On this day, an eastern portion of the pool was roped off as two instructors shared tips on how to get rolling on a 65-pound, red-and-yellow synthetic log.

“Remember, as soon as you get on, get those feet moving fast,” an instructor said. “And don’t look at your feet, look at the ends of the log.”

As one person after another hopped onto the log, the challenge began. Slowly and steadily, each person stood up, but just as their legs straightened, they tumbled back into the water.

“Oh, I don’t have it,” said a mom as she fell backwards, splashing into the pool. “It’s harder than it looks.”

After several tries, the time on the log grew longer for some, not so much for others. Boys seemed to catch on the fastest, some log rolling for up to 20 seconds.

But no matter the skill level, the group supported its fellow log rollers with applause and cheers.

Outside the pool, moms and dads watched excitedly as their children attempted a new sport. Each time one of her two daughters made her way onto the log, even if the turn lasted only seconds, Shonna Sveen-St. John whipped out the camera for pictures.

Her daughters’s interest in log rolling surprised her, but she was happy to oblige their request to spend the evening trying out a new activity.

“The girls dug around in the activity book and found the demo,” she said. “They’re really excited about it. I had the day off, so here we are.”

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