Westminster water line, tank projects moving along

Staff Report
Posted 11/28/17

A pair of water pipe projects have been slowing Lowell Boulevard traffic, but that should begin shift next week. Stephen Grooters, Westminster’s utilities engineering manager, said work building …

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Westminster water line, tank projects moving along

Posted

A pair of water pipe projects have been slowing Lowell Boulevard traffic, but that should begin shift next week.

Stephen Grooters, Westminster’s utilities engineering manager, said work building new water tanks and a pump atop Gregory Hill is set to begin just as work installing new water pipelines under Lowell Boulevard is set to shift downhill.

The water pipe project began late in the summer and has caused detours. Now Grooters said the work is shifting to 80th Avenue, where crews will continue installing new pipe.

The work is not a part of the Gregory Hill tank project, Grooters said.

City Councilors approved that work in August. It’s designed to replace two existing tanks, each holding about two million gallons of water. The easternmost tank, at about 82nd and Osceola Street, came online in 1954; its neighbor to the west in 1960. The entire complex would move about 200 feet to the northeast, effectively moving from the dead-end at Osceola Street to the dead-end at Newton Street.

The new tanks would be larger — each would hold about one million gallons of water more and would be nearly twice as tall as the existing tanks. In addition, the city is building a small pumping station to the east to help fill the tanks.

Grooters said contractors have been moving equipment and supplies onto the site so far and are scheduled to begin taking down the old tanks this week. He expects the project will be entirely finished by April 2019.

The City is also working with the neighbors to design fencing and a decorative wall that will be installed as part of the project.

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