COVID-19’s impact:Voices from our community

Posted 4/8/20

“It’s the most impactful not being able to get together with friends for us and for our daughter. Thankfully, there’s technology. We FaceTime and have tea parties over the phone. We don’t …

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COVID-19’s impact:Voices from our community

Posted

Arvada resident Emily Costner and her daughter, Adeline, during a walk at Ralston-Central Park..
Arvada resident Emily Costner and her daughter, Adeline, during a walk at Ralston-Central Park..
“It’s the most impactful not being able to get together with friends for us and for our daughter. Thankfully, there’s technology. We FaceTime and have tea parties over the phone. We don’t tell her the really scary stuff, but we explained to her that we need to be mindful. She knows she can’t play on the playground. We went to Walmart and she was really good about not touching anything. We’re approaching it as: If we’re sick, we don’t want to get anyone else sick. She’s been a trooper and she hasn’t complained. We’ll get through it.”

— Emily Costner, 35, Arvada, marketer for financial adviser

Tommy Kummer
Tommy Kummer
“I think it’s been pretty eyeopening from the point of view of what we are capable of as a community and just humans in general. It’s been tough but we are staying busy enough at Nosu to keep the doors open. Right now I am here at the restaurant six or seven days a week because we can’t afford to pay a whole staff right now. So that’s kind of been my social distancing.”

— Tommy Kummer, 33, Golden, Chef at Nosu Ramen

Westminster Trails and Open Space volunteer Thom Mandl said March 31 that since a Community cleanup day, tentatively set for April 25, is in question he'd use his time in quarantine cleaning up the Big Dry Creek Trail where it comes near his house.."For the last couple of weeks, I just come out and spend an hour or a full bag -- whichever comes first," Mandl said. "My kids and I use the trail a lot. We bike here, I hike here all the time. It's a wonderful resource so it's a little something I can do."
Westminster Trails and Open Space volunteer Thom Mandl said March 31 that since a Community cleanup day, tentatively set for April 25, is in question …
“For the last couple of weeks, I just come out and spend an hour or a full bag -- whichever comes first,” said Mandl, along the Big Dry Creek Trail. “My kids and I use the trail a lot. We bike here, I hike here all the time. It’s a wonderful resource so it’s a little something I can do.”

— Westminster Trails and Open Space volunteer Thom Mandl

Sue King
Sue King
“I am a little more prepared than some people. I grew up on a farm, so we always have a good supply of things that we might need in events like a blizzard. That happens fairly often in Fort Collins — the area where I grew up. I volunteer for a lot of different situations, like the Jefferson County Boys & Girls Club. I have not left the house since March 12.”

— Sue King, 81 years old. Lakewood resident and former Lakewood city councilmember. 

Kelly Theiler
Kelly Theiler
“(The COVID-19 pandemic) has changed my forecast on how I see relationships and how I have planned for the relationships in my life with my family, friends and for work. It has created a lot of uncertainty. I am in a position where I have no family in Colorado. All of my family lives in Wisconsin. The uncertainty of not knowing when we’ll see each other is pretty heavy.”

— Kelly Theiler. Age 36. Lakewood resident and real estate agent. 

Rachel Lucero, owner of LuEllen's Gifts & Cards at Colorado Mills.
Rachel Lucero, owner of LuEllen's Gifts & Cards at Colorado Mills.
“I work at Regis University for their catering department. I have been off work the last couple of weeks and just went back to work there on a part-time basis. I’m just trying to figure out how things are going to work, how long this is going to last, and I am looking to see if I qualify as a small business, because I do not have any employees. It is uncertain. I can’t see family or friends. My parents are older and have some underline health issues. It makes us nervous that we can’t see anyone, and I am financially nervous. I am trying to stay home and be safe.”

— Rachel Lucero. Age 52. Lakewood resident. Food service provider at Regis University and owner of LuEllen’s Gifts & Cards at the Colorado Mills Mall. 

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