Historic homes on display as part of Northglenn’s 50th anniversary

Home tour takes in three different versions of city’s architecture

Posted 10/9/19

A historic homes tour will show how Northglenn started and contrast that with one vision for how it could have turned out and another how it actually did. “You really do get to see a lot on the …

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Historic homes on display as part of Northglenn’s 50th anniversary

Home tour takes in three different versions of city’s architecture

Posted

A historic homes tour will show how Northglenn started and contrast that with one vision for how it could have turned out and another how it actually did.

“You really do get to see a lot on the tour,” said Lauren Weatherly, of the Northglenn Historic Commission. “It shows some really nice, very different homes that make up the city.”

Northglenn’s Historic Preservation Foundation is hosting an Oct. 13 open house at various locations, a self-guided tour through the city’s 50-year history and well beyond.

“The area has lots of history,” Weatherly said. “We’re celebrating the anniversary of the city being incorporated, but everything being featured are part of the foundations of the city even before it was founded in 1969.”

Northglenn was officially founded on April 27, 1969, and the city has spent much of the year celebrating that, with special events and additions to annual festivals as well as commissioning a mural and other programs.

The 50th Anniversary Home Tour runs from 10 a.m to 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 per person in advance or $20 for the tour and a print of poster for the show.

The tour begins at the Victorian-style Stonehocker Farmhouse on Fox Run Parkway, just west of Carpenter Park. It’s the oldest standing brick farmhouse in Adams County and dates back to the last part of 1800s.

“This area was all agricultural before it was developed,” Weatherly said. “So the Stonehocker farmhouse was part of a dairy farm. It’s beautiful and has been restored to period appropriate everything.”

That’s where people taking the tour will start.

“That will be the first stop, where people will check in if they’ve already bought tickets or buy them,” Weatherly said. “We’ll have a booklet they get that has the information about the neighborhoods and a map to other stops. It’s an open house style, so people are welcome to navigate to the stops on their own and wander them. The homeowners and volunteers will be hosting each home.

At least six other homes are included in tour, a mix of households in the Perl Mack and Deza Estates Neighborhoods.

“When Northglenn really started being incorporated, there were two main developments that were going up,” she said. “One was the Perl Mack development that was called Northglenn and that started being built in the late 1950s. And then there was Deza Estates and it was built by a different perspective. It was going to be part of a whole planned community with a community centers and riding stables and swimming pools.”

The Perl Mack development became the standard for Northglenn and is typified by homes around 104th and Grant Street. The Deza Estates homes were built around 99th and Huron.

“Perl Mack was very successful and the Deza Estates developer got 28 homes built, and then sort of disappeared,” she said.

Rather than standard suburban split-level or ranch style homes, the Deza Estate homes were built in the mid-century modern style, with more open floor plans and less traditional architectural features.

“The Perl Mack homes are a great representation of the development and buildings of the time, in the late 1950s,” she said. “Deza had a more creative vision. As it turned out, the Perl Mack vision was the one that worked.”

Weatherly said it’s important to note the history of the homes, even if they don’t seem special or exotic to our eyes.

“Back when Victorian homes and styles were being built, people didn’t think they were special, either,” Weatherly said. “But it takes a couple of generations after something is built for it to be really recognized. And that’s when building start to be lost to demolition and beautiful buildings end up gone. So it’s important to start talking about historic preservation at that 50 year mark.”

Weatherly said her home in the Deza Estate is the final stop on the tour and she and her husband are hosting a community party.

“We’ll have a food truck and the Northglenn block party truck, and everyone can hang out and talk and take in the views, because they are great,” she said.

Arvada artist Jim Stigall created a special print for the tour, showing the Stonehocker Farmhouse and typical Perl Mack and Deza homes. That print is for sale for $25, or $20 as part of the tour.

“I’ve shown it to a few people and they thought it was pretty great,” she said.

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