Letter to the Editor: Vote for candidates, not parties

Posted 9/11/19

My kudos to Bill Christopher for his August 29 “Cross Currents” column. In these politically-divisive times, it is indeed important that we participate in our …

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Letter to the Editor: Vote for candidates, not parties

Posted

Vote for candidates, not parties

My kudos to Bill Christopher for his August 29 “Cross Currents” column. In these politically-divisive times, it is indeed important that we participate in our elections, that we be informed about our candidates prior to voting and that we vote for the candidate rather than the party.

While many people decry party politics, I question how many still take the easy, short-sighted route of voting a party ticket. The major parties — and candidates as well — will not civilize their campaigns if we voters approve their objectionable behavior by our voting patterns.

I would even go farther in saying that candidates’ character can be more important than their stands on issues. I would rather be represented by people with different views from mine, but who are civic-minded enough — honestly civic-minded enough — to consider a range of viewpoints; people who understand that compromise, if for the public good, is not weakness but it is actually maturity.

How can you trust decisions that have not been through the mill of varying perspectives and debate? No individual (and, yes, I do have a national-level figure particularly in mind) can possibly have all the “right” knowledge or answers, particularly when those answers affect the broad diversity of our society.

Democracy can still be very positive when led by people with the character and civic values that we citizens deserve. Party affiliations are a poor substitute.

Kirk Sarell, Northglenn

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