Rethinking milk: Clearing up a cloudy subject

Eating Well: A column by Paul Webster
Special to Colorado Community Media
Posted 2/5/19

Milk is not as healthy as you have been led to believe. We all think that milk helps build strong bones, but that message came from an advertising campaign and not a quality scientific study. Reports …

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Rethinking milk: Clearing up a cloudy subject

Posted

Milk is not as healthy as you have been led to believe. We all think that milk helps build strong bones, but that message came from an advertising campaign and not a quality scientific study.

Reports on nutrition studies are often confusing. When you hear about studies regarding milk or any other nutrition related product, you should question the funding source for the study. If the study has been funded by a group that will benefit financially, such as the Dairy Industry, it is important to understand how the results were achieved.

Humans are the only species that consumes the milk of other animals. Roughly 65 percent of the human population is unable to process the lactose sugars in milk, causing mild to severe digestion issues. There should be some cause for concern when more than half of the population cannot properly digest milk. Let’s take a look at some of the non-industry funded studies that have been done on milk and dairy products.

Protect your children

Type 1 diabetes is strongly correlated with the consumption of cow’s milk in infants. Studies dating back 30 years have linked milk consumption to type 1 diabetes, but recent studies have shown a much stronger correlation to the bovine insulin and casein proteins in milk.

On theory says that the A-1 casein proteins and bovine insulin cause an infant’s digestive system to create antibodies that ultimately destroy the insulin producing cells in the pancreas, resulting in type 1 diabetes.

A simple fix for acne

I suggested to a friend that her 14-year-old daughter should give up all dairy products. In doing so, her daughter’s severe acne cleared up in six weeks without medication.

Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease, and like all animal products, milk is an inflammatory food. Acne can be aggravated by the consumption of milk, and skim milk is worse. According to a 2005 study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the consumption of skim milk has a stronger association with acne than regular milk because the hormones in skim milk are concentrated.

Other dairy concerns

A study funded by the National Cancer Institute published in February 2017 showed more than a 50 percent increase in the risk of breast cancer for women who frequently consumed fluid milk, cheddar cheese or processed American cheese. Another study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, a 2015 meta-analysis from 32 separate studies determined that the consumption of dairy products incrementally increased the risk for prostate cancer in men.

In 2014, the British Medical Journal reported a study of more than 100,000 Swedish men and women which showed that high milk consumption is associated with an increase in bone fractures and all-cause mortality in both men and women.

Cow’s milk is designed to make a 65 pound calf grow to 500 pounds in 12 months, children don’t need to grow that fast. Cow’s milk is naturally full of steroids and hormones designed for cows, not humans. Many milk producers introduce antibiotics and synthetic hormones to prevent illness and increase milk production. Those antibiotics and hormones end up in the milk you drink.

It may be a good time to look into dairy alternatives if you have health concerns.

Paul Webster is certified in Holistic Nutrition, Weight Management, Sports Nutrition and Training. His opinions are not necessarily those of Colorado Community Media.

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