Texas Raiders come to RMMA

Luke Zarzecki
lzarzecki@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 9/16/22

Vistors at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport had the chance to go inside World War II fighter planes from Sept. 8-11th. 

The Gulf Coast Wing of the Commemorative Air Force brought the B-17 …

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Texas Raiders come to RMMA

Posted

Visitors at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport had the chance to go inside World War II fighter planes from Sept. 8-11th. 

The Gulf Coast Wing of the Commemorative Air Force brought the B-17 Flying Fortress,  also known as the Texas Raiders, and opened up the plane for tours. Some were able to purchase a ticket to take a ride on the plane.

The B-17 was first flown in 1935 and was the largest land-based plane in the world at that time. It was primarily used in daylight bombing campaigns against German forces, supplementing British overnight bombing. 

According to information provided by the CAF, the plane helped reduced Hitler's ability to wage war, which lead to Germany's ultimate surrender. 

The plane carried a crew of nine or ten and had a bomb load of 5,000-6,000 pounds. It is also equipped with machine guns at different locations in the plane. 

After the war, most of the planes were switched out for newer and more advanced planes. Only 47 airframes survived and only five, including Texas Raiders, are actively flying. 

The cost to fly the plane is $3,500 an hour and the CAF relies on donations for its operation.

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